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Best Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses *1

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Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses. The chemical forms of iron used in prenatal supplements varied. About half of the nonprescription and prescription products used ferrous fumarate, 31% used amino acid chelates, 5% used carbonyl or elemental iron, and 21% used other or unspecified chemical forms.[1]

Several newer sources of iron are being used in prenatal supplement products. These include pharmaceutical-grade iron polysaccharide complexes.

What is ferrous fumarate and folic acid?

Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses
Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses

Ferrous fumarate and folic acid tablets are used to treat anemia due to poor iron absorption. They contain a combination of iron, folic acid and a polysaccharide that helps to increase the absorption of iron. They are usually taken with food or at bedtime to reduce gastrointestinal side effects. They are also used to prevent anemia in pregnant women who have had a low iron level. The chemical form of iron in these products varies, but most use ferrous fumarate as the source of iron and amino acid chelates or carbonyl or elemental iron as the iron carrier.[2]

How should I take ferrous fumarate and folic acid?

Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses
Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses

Ferrous fumarate and folic acid tablets should be taken with food to minimize gastrointestinal side effects. If your pet is not accustomed to taking supplements, start with one tablet and gradually increase the number of tablets as needed. Dogs and cats should be given ferrous fumarate and folic acid at bedtime, or as recommended by your veterinarian. If your pet is prone to diarrhea, it may be helpful to feed a high-fiber diet. This is particularly important if your pet has constipation because iron polysaccharide can promote regularity. It is also good for promoting normal red blood cell production. In addition, folic acid helps prevent neural tube defects in pregnant women.[3]

What happens if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of ferrous fumarate and folic acid tablets, take it as soon as possible. If you can’t take it as soon as possible, ask your doctor if a different type of iron-containing prenatal supplement is safe for you.

The amount of elemental iron in most nonprescription and prescription supplements varies, according to the labeling in NIH’s Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) and DailyMed. The chemical forms of iron used in these products vary: 49% of the nonprescription and 44% of the prescription products used ferrous fumarate as the source of elemental iron, 31% of the nonprescription and 14% of the prescription products used amino acid chelates, and 5% of the nonprescription and 19% of the prescription products used carbonyl or elemental iron.[4]

Where can I get more information?

You can get more information about ferrous fumarate and folic acid tablets by visiting the FDA’s website. There you can find a consumer information page and get answers to frequently asked questions about the product. You can also contact your health care provider if you have any questions about the product. In addition, you can get more information from the manufacturer about the product. This is a great way to stay on top of all the latest information.[5]

Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses During Pregnancy

During pregnancy, women need more iron than usual. This means that they need to take this medicine in addition to their normal diet to ensure their body gets enough of it.

Ferrous fumarate and folic acid tablets uses include treating or preventing iron deficiency anaemia (low blood count). This medication is subsidised by the government on the pharmaceutical benefits scheme (PBS).[6]

Contraindications

Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses
Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses

Ferrous fumarate and folic acid tablets uses include the treatment or prevention of iron deficiency anaemia, a condition in which the body does not make enough healthy red blood cells. It can happen because of blood loss, pregnancy or when there is too little iron in the diet.

It’s taken as tablets, capsules or liquid that you swallow. It’s usually given once a day and should be taken on an empty stomach, 30 minutes before or 2 hours after eating. It should not be given if your child has a stomach upset or problems with food, as it may stop the medicine from working properly.[7]

Your doctor will work out the dose that’s right for your child. It’s important to give it regularly for 3-4 weeks to make sure that it works properly.

You should also leave a gap of about 2 hours after you take it before you have tea, coffee, dairy products, eggs or soybean products, as these may stop your body absorbing the iron properly.

Folic acid is a B-complex vitamin that’s needed by the body to make red blood cells. It’s especially important for pregnant women, as it prevents neural tube defects and reduces the risk of low birth weight babies.

It can be used to treat or prevent iron deficiency anaemia in adults, adolescents and children who are aged 12 years and over. It’s mainly used to help with iron deficiency anaemia in men and women who are having or have had a baby, but it can also be used for other conditions.[8]

Special Precautions

Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses
Ferrous Fumarate and Folic Acid Tablets Uses

During pregnancy the body’s need for iron and folic acid increases. This can cause anaemia if the body is not getting enough of these nutrients. Pregnant women need to take an iron and folic acid supplement such as this medicine to ensure they have enough of these nutrients for themselves, their baby and the placenta.

This tablet contains folic acid and iron (ferrous fumarate and ferrous sulphate). It can be used to help prevent anaemia in pregnant women.

Folic acid is a B-complex vitamin that is needed by the body to manufacture red blood cells. Folic acid is not an alternative to taking iron supplements because it does not treat the anaemia that occurs when a woman has a vitamin B12 deficiency (pernicious anaemia).

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions about the use of this medication. It is only part of a complete treatment program that also includes a diet plan and a regular exercise program.[9]

Your doctor may recommend you use an antacid with this medicine. It is important to use the right kind of antacid and avoid other types that contain different medicines.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and herbal products. Some of these drugs can interact with this medicine and make it less effective or cause serious side effects.[10]

Adverse Reactions

Ferrous fumarate and folic acid tablets uses include the treatment of anaemia, particularly megaloblastic anaemia, caused by a deficiency in iron. It helps the body to make more haemoglobin, a protein that carries oxygen around the blood. It can also be used to prevent anaemia in children who are at risk of it, or before they have surgery.

The amount of ferrous fumarate that your child needs will depend on their age, weight and other factors. Your doctor will work out the right dose for your child.

If your child has a problem with their stomach (esophagus) or intestines, they may find it difficult to swallow the tablets or capsules. This is very common and usually goes away within a few days.[11]

Another side effect of ferrous fumarate and folic acid is an increased risk of developing bowel inflammation, or ulcers. This is more likely to happen in people with inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.

There is also a small risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, especially in the elderly and people with iron deficiency. This is more likely in people with a history of bleeding or those who take other medicines for indigestion or ulcers, such as paracetamol.

Folic acid is a B-complex vitamin that is needed by the body to make red blood cells and prevent anaemia. It is also needed during pregnancy to keep the unborn baby healthy.[12]

Over dosage

Iron is a naturally occurring substance in the body and is essential for blood clotting and oxygen transport. Overdosage of iron supplements can lead to iron poisoning and even death. Therefore, it is important to follow the dosage instructions and never take more than the recommended dose.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends daily oral supplementation with 30 mg to 60 mg of elemental iron and 400 g of folic acid for women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. This can reduce maternal anemia, puerperal sepsis, low birth weight and preterm delivery.

A recent innovation in the delivery of minerals and vitamins has been ‘point of use’ fortification, which involves the addition of microencapsulated iron to semi-solid food. This has been found to improve adherence by improving the absorption of iron via the ‘buffering’ effect of the food matrix.[13]

However, the bioavailability of iron in this ‘point of use’ fortification is relatively low because of the lipid encapsulate that surrounds the iron source. It has been shown that the relative bioavailability of ‘point of use’ fortification increased with the addition of ascorbic acid, which acts as both a reducing agent and a chelator in the intestinal lumen to promote iron absorption.

A randomized, crossover study of 18 healthy pregnant subjects compared the relative bioavailability of iron in tablet (27 mg ferrous fumarate) and powdered (30 mg micronized dispersible ferric pyrophosphate) ‘point of use’ fortificants sprinkled over a standardized meal. The mean incremental changes in serum iron concentration over 8 hours were measured.[14]

Drug Interactions

Autrin Capsule contains iron, folic acid and vitamin B12. Folic acid is essential to numerous bodily functions from nucleotide biosynthesis to the remethylation of homocysteine. It is especially important during periods of rapid cell division and growth.

Ferrous fumarate and folic acid tablets uses are used to prevent and treat iron deficiency and folate deficiency, particularly during pregnancy and in megaloblastic anaemia. They do not prevent vitamin B12 deficiency, which can cause neurological damage.

These tablets are given orally (by mouth). The dosage is based on the patient’s condition and may be increased as needed. The recommended dosage for adults is one tablet a day, taken with food. Children under 12 years of age should be given a lower dose.[15]

This medicine is absorbed best when it is taken at bedtime. If gastric intolerance occurs, it may be taken with food or as an antacid.

If you are taking any other medications, discuss them with your doctor. These medicines can interact with this drug and affect how it works.

Medications that reduce the amount of iron in your body, such as antacids or colestyramine, could also make it harder for you to absorb this medicine. Do not take these medicines together with this medicine.

Food Interaction

During pregnancy, your doctor may prescribe ferrous fumarate and folic acid to treat iron deficiency anemia. These tablets are part of a complete treatment plan that also includes diet changes and other medicines.[16]

Your doctor will tell you how much to take and when to take it. It is best to take this medicine on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

Avoid taking any antacids or drugs that contain calcium (such as calcium citrate or calcium phosphate) or zinc within 2 hours before or after you take this medicine. These drugs can make it harder for your body to absorb ferrous fumarate.

A recent study in healthy pregnant women tested the relative bioavailability of a new iron source called SunActive Fe(r) and a traditional tablet supplement that contains 27 mg of ferrous fumarate. Eighteen women were randomized to receive either the traditional tablet supplement or a powdered supplement that contained 30 mg of micronized dispersible ferric pyrophosphate (MDFP) and 600 mg of folic acid.[17]

The study showed that iron in the powdered supplement was more absorbed than the ferrous fumarate in the tablet supplement. This was likely due to the effect of the food matrix on gastric dissolution, and the addition of ascorbic acid in both supplements, which acts as a reducer and a chelator in the intestinal lumen. These results suggest that MDFP in the powdered supplement may be an appropriate source of iron for a ‘point of use’ fortificant, particularly where low adherence is a concern.[18]

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